Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM)


What is a Print disability?

A person who cannot effectively read print because of a visual, physical, perceptual, developmental, cognitive or learning disability has a "print disability."

What does the law tell us?

"...nothing in this section would relieve an SEA (or LEA) of its responsibility to ensure that children with disabilities who need instructional materials in accessible formats, but who do not fall within the category of children for whom the SEA may receive assistance from NIMAC, receive those instructional materials in a timely manner. Timely access to appropriate and accessible instructional materials is an inherent component of public agencies' obligations under the Act to ensure that FAPE is available for children with disabilities and that they participate in the general education curriculum as specified in their IEPs." (Section 3000.172(b)(3))"

in other words.....

- LEA is responsible for children who need AIM
- Even if they don't qualify for other programs
- They must be completed in a timely manner
- "inherent component...to ensure FAPE."

Types of Text:

I. TRADITIONAL TEXT
II. ELECTRONIC TEXT
III. ACCESSIBLE TEXT- The formats of AIM (Accessible Instructional Materials) are Braille, large print, audio, and digital

*Access to Accessible Core Instructional Materials: Step by Step Procedures**


Sources:
1. Publishers- find out from text book publishers to see if they have the electronic materials available (this electronic version of the text is known as the "ASCII" version)

2. NIMAS- this is part of IDEA 2004, the National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard each state has a NIMAC (a center to convert the NIMAS files)

3. Bookshare.org

4. RFB&D (Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic)

5. Infinitext

6. Bookshare: http://www.bookshare.org

7. RFB&D: http://www.rfbd.org

8. National Library Service: http://www.loc.gov/nls/

9. SparkNotes: http://www.sparknotes.com

10. Shmoop: http://www.shmoop.com

11. Wikipedia: http://www.wikipedia.org

12. Classic Reader: http://www.classicreader.org

13. Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org

14. Baldwin Online Children's Literature Project: http://www.mainlesson.com

15. TarHeel Reader: http://www.tarheelreader.org

16. Bibli's Bookshelf: http://www.simtalk.com/bibli/index1024.htm

17. Balabolka: http://www.cross-plus-a.com/balabolka

18. Zamzar: http://www.zamzar.com

19. Google Translate: http://www.google.com/translate

On Line Libraries-24 Places to Read Free Books Online: Download this to obtain an additional list of on line libraries. 

Audio Books:


OverDrive Media Console – http://www.overdrive.com/software/omc/ free - use for downloading and transferring audio books from a public library’s website to an iPod, iPad, iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile phones, or to listen to audio books on the computer.

Log into your local public library and search for audio books you can download using your library card. OverDrive will convert and transfer the files directly to you MP3 player.